.

Puyallup School Board Named 'Board of Distinction' in 2012

For the fourth consecutive year, the Puyallup School Board has been named a Board of Distinction in Washington state.

For the fourth consecutive year, the Puyallup School Board has been named a Board of Distinction in Washington state.

Puyallup is one of 10 school boards from districts with more than 9,000 students to receive the honor from the Washington State School Directors Association (WSSDA).

A total of 23 of the state’s 295 districts, including those identified as small- and medium-sized districts, received the recognition on November 16 at the annual WSSDA conference in Spokane.

Superintendent Tim Yeomans, who attended the award ceremony with board members, said the honor is “a well-earned recognition for outstanding stewards.”

Locally, the directors will be recognized for the special honor at the November 26 Puyallup School Board meeting. The meeting begins at 6 p.m. at Ballou Junior High School, 9916 136th St. E. in Puyallup.

The award recognizes the work of school board directors Pat Donovan, Greg Heath, Chris Ihrig, Pat Jenkins, and Dane Looker.

The Board of Distinction program honors school boards that demonstrate effective use of the Washington School Board Standards.

The standards, developed and adopted by WSSDA in 2009, promote research-based governance practices that lead to high levels of student and district performance.

Award applicants are required to submit an essay and supportive evidence to demonstrate how they are putting the new standards into practice. This year, applicants were asked to address the following benchmarks:

  • Respecting and advocating mutual understanding of the roles and responsibilities of board members and the superintendent.
  • Adopting a collaboratively-developed district plan focused on learning and achievement outcomes for all students.
  • Providing for learning essentials, including rigorous curriculum, technology, and high-quality facilities.
  • Measuring student academic progress and needs based on valid and reliable assessments.
  • Ensuring district information and decisions are communicated community-wide.

Applications are evaluated by an independent review panel, and awards are given to those who receive at least 70 points out of a possible 100.

--

Editor's Note: This is a press release from the Puyallup School District.

robert mc dowell February 16, 2013 at 08:08 PM
The Puyallup School board wonders why the people don’t vote for more schools bonds, etc. Well, the answer is easy. Let’s us me for an example: I used to vote yes for school bonds until I started to realize that the money requirement for schools is really a bottomless money pit with no sight of ever, never needing money. The final straw for me was when, I believe it was a high school, stated in the paper that if they did not get approved for their millions of dollars in the bond this time, that they would have to discontinue the marching band, art classes and the football team. Well, people that had kids became worried and so voted for it and the school received all the money they wanted. Yet, great shock, they still threw out the band and closed some classes. I never note ‘yes’ for the school bonds anymore. After so many years the young parents will realize the truth and they will not vote for them anymore either. But do not worry, shoving the bond every few months down their throats will eventually get voted in. You have to wait until older people move away or they give up. If it wasn’t such a bottomless pit I would always vote for it if it came up every five years and for a reasonable amount, but that has never happened. I remember them saying that when the lotto was beginning, that it would give a percentage to the schools and they would never have to worry about money again. But that was a fairy tale. Now you know the truth.

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »